News

ASSP Chapter – March 9th Meeting is Cancelled

Posted: Mar 06, 2020

We regret to inform you, the March Chapter Meeting is cancelled.

Please mark your calendars for next month’s joint meeting with SFPE & Officer Elections, April 13th, 2020.

Georgia Chapter PDC is scheduled for May 11th, 2020

Regional Silica NEP Outreach Letter

Posted: Mar 03, 2020

Greetings:

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established a revised National Emphasis Program (NEP) to identify and reduce or eliminate worker exposures to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) in general industry, maritime, and construction. The NEP will use a combination of outreach and targeted enforcement to ensure that employers provide a safe workplace for their employees. The NEP targets specific industries expected to have the highest numbers of workers exposed to silica, and focuses on enforcement of the new silica standards for general industry, maritime (29 CFR § 1910.1053) and construction (29 CFR § 1926.1153). These standards became effective in June 2016.

Construction employers were required to begin complying with their standard as of September 23, 2017, and general industry and maritime employers were required to begin complying with their standard as of June 23, 2018.

What is silica and why is OSHA focusing on it?

Respirable crystalline silica consists of small silica particles that are generated by cutting, sawing, grinding, drilling, and crushing materials such as stone, rock, concrete, brick, block, and mortar. Inhaling the dust created during these operations can cause silicosis, an incurable lung disease, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. For more information on the health effects from silica exposure, and how employers can protect workers, visit OSHA’s Safety and Health Topics webpage on crystalline silica.

What changes were made to the NEP?

  • Revised application to the lower permissible exposure limit for respirable crystalline silica to 50 micrograms per cubic meter (µg/m3) as an 8-hour time-weighted average in general industry, maritime, and construction;
  • Updated list of target industries, as listed in the appendix of the NEP; from this list, area offices will develop randomized establishment lists of employers in their local jurisdictions for targeted inspections;
  • Compliance safety and health officers will refer to current enforcement guidance for respirable crystalline silica inspection procedures and
    • State Plans must participate because of the nationwide exposures to

 

To help employers in their efforts to identify and correct exposure to respirable crystalline silica, your local Area Office is available to answer questions and concerns.

 

OSHA also funds a free consultation program under Section 21(d) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act for small employers. The consultation program helps employers identify and correct hazardous conditions at their worksites, as well as improve occupational safety and health management systems. These programs are well staffed with highly trained safety and health

professionals. To schedule an on-site consultation visit, please contact your local consultation program (Consultation Directory).

 

The Respirable Crystalline Silica NEP became effective on February 4, 2020 beginning with a three-month period of education and prevention outreach. During this time, OSHA will also continue to investigate complaints, referrals, hospitalizations, and fatalities.

Silica is one of the most abundant minerals on the planet and when it is cut, sawed, grinded on, drilled or crushed it can release respirable particles that can lead to silicosis or cancer. To help prevent this, the OSHA standard contains straight forward common sense approaches to controlling this exposure.

Thank you for your interest in protecting the safety and health of your workforce.

 

Kurt A. Petermeyer, Regional Administrator

https://www.dol.gov/

OSHA – US Department of Labor – National Emphasis Program targeting Amputations

Posted: Jan 31, 2020

 

US Department of Labor

Greetings:

Amputations hazards continue to cause serious injuries and deaths every year. In an attempt to eliminate these catastrophic, yet preventable events, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has revised its National Emphasis Program (NEP) targeting Amputations in Manufacturing Industries and will be increasing compliance assistance efforts and enforcement inspections.

OSHA’s enforcement history shows that employees are often injured when machinery or equipment is not properly guarded or when hazardous energy is not controlled during maintenance or servicing.

This NEP targets industrial and manufacturing workplaces having machinery and equipment that can potentially cause amputations. To assist employers in their efforts to identify and correct these hazards, your local Area Office is available to answer questions and concerns.

As part of this renewed emphasis program, compliance assistance products are readily available to assist companies in enhancing their safety and health program. OSHA’s Machine Guarding and Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) webpages provides compliance assistance resources to help employers identify amputation hazards, follow required procedures to properly guard stationary and portable machines, as well as provide guidance to implement an energy control program.

OSHA also funds a free consultation program under Section 21(d) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act for small employers. The consultation program helps employers identify and correct hazardous conditions at their worksites, as well as improve occupational safety and health management systems. These programs are well staffed with highly trained safety and health professionals. To schedule an on-site consultation visit, please contact your local consultation program (Consultation Directory)

The Amputations in Manufacturing Industries NEP became effective on December 12, 2019, beginning with a three-month period of education and prevention outreach. During this time, OSHA will also continue to investigate complaints, referrals, hospitalizations, and fatalities.

Remember that employees working on unguarded or not properly locked and tagged out machinery and equipment can suffer permanent disabilities, or even lose their life. There are safety standards that when properly implemented will help ensure that employers control and prevent serious hazards and provide safe workplaces for all workers.

 

Thank you for your interest in protecting the safety and health of our workforce.

 

Kurt A. Petermeyer

 

Our Chapter Sponsors